Tymboo

History

H

Since 1869

Roy Gittins inherited Tymboo from his parents Norman and Hannah, who inherited the farm from the original owners, Thomas and Agnes Gittins, who gained proprietary rights to the property in 1869.

Tymboo station remains unusual in the Logan district for surviving within one family's ownership since being divided from its original squatter's run in the 1860s.

1800

1862

Thomas Gittins arrives in Brisbane

1869

Thomas and Agnes Gittins gained proprietary rights to the property

1875

Thomas noted that the local children, including his own, were growing up without education.  He started a class in a room at his own home in 1875.

1879

Local residents supported Thomas’s endeavour through the contribution of funds and labour and erected a school building which opened as the Teviot Junction Provisional School on 13 September 1879 with 12 students attending.

1899

The Teviot Junction State School closed in 1899 with 19 students.  The school buildings were later purchased by Norman Gittins and relocated to Tymboo and to another property at Pine Creek, Canungra.

1900

1912

The family lived in the old slab house until 1912, when the Tymboo homestead was built by German immigrant, Fred Klumpp with assistance from his brother Jack.

1927

Roy placed his Canungra dairy on half shares in 1927, at which time he returned to assist with the running of Tymboo.

1936

In 1936 Roy returned to Flying Fox, Canungra and focussed on improving his own property.  Norman then built a cottage on Tymboo and put the dairy on half shares

1943

The dairy was closed and the property turned to cattle breeding.

1946

Roy bought Tymboo homestead from his father and in the same year also bought Clare from him, before marrying Sylvia Bagnall on the 15th October 1949.

2000

2012

Josh moves into The Cottage, formerly the dairy workers acommodation.

2015

The extension is built alongside the original house, where the bush-house previously stood.

2017

Isaac builds a house on the property.